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and the department of the environment is here as well (railroad noise). >> yes and all positive activities. the railway station is historic and it will remain that way, so again welcome to heron's head park. by the way for those of you who don't know why it's named this way is because if you ever have a chance to get above this area and see it literally is shaped like a heron's head and this is part of the honoring of our waterfront area. it's a great investment and of course it will lead me to say with the responsible, and this year is our proposition b which extends another great investment of $195 million to many other areas including the south east sector of open space that we got to take care of, and modernize. this is what rec and park does very well with dpw with all of the capital leadership in the city that i got to work on with the city administrator. we need to take care of the infrastructure in many ways and we are loving our parks and why we want this great investment to continue and this is another small yet important addition. we will have $35 million more of that with t
one day intercede between humans and eir sometimes-olent environment. narrator: in the subregion of latin america called "southern south america," the country of chile is also threated by volcanoes and earthquakes. but here, pacific rim dynamism is more about economics than plate tectonics. 2,500 miles long and averaging just 90 miles wide, this elongated state spans diversrangeof natural environm. each of those environments offers opportunities based on those activities,vity. chile has grown a dynamic export ecomy. th growthas brought numerous changes to chile's han geography, incling gend rolbrought d settlement patterns. chile's capil, santiago, is the cenr of tountry's service sector, the largest part of its economy. ers inoun amic santhe resultvingeupe popun of mostly spanish colonization over several centuries. but more recently, chile'sthe primary snt foreign connecto the osideorldth europe. are best seen here, in valparaíso, chile's largest port. foreign trade is a cornerstone of the new economy, and most of it is with pacific m countries, including the united states. ma
a lot of work on measuring levels of chemicals in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels, it's hard to make changes when jurisdictions move. >> but if i could get her contact information or something after the presentation, that would be great. >> okay, cool. >> i had two questions, one is you were just saying to use glass when you're cooking or microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles
environment. and if there's a formal versus informal way to do that, i wanted to know what that was. >> the reason we put that in is we wanted to try to explain that because this is a state-wide search and we are getting the firm, some of the firms, one or two might be located in the near region to -- i don't want to say it's the san francisco bay area, but in that kind of region we are, la, they have presences in other -- you know, like they may have an east coast main ofrs and they have presence in california. but what we're trying to say to them is this is a unique environment just like you guys were saying, unique environment, has difficulties that are inherent in the fact it is unique the way it works with the board and the commissions and the mayor. this is not an easy place. they need to understand the search environment -- the searcher needs to understand whoever they are recommending has to be someone who has some experience or familiarity that this is politically charged. so it was trying to make it a pc way of saying, you know, san francisco, that we're special. >> okay,
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
and create a path forward. >> you are worried about the environment and climate change. philip wiley wrote "generation of vipers." he said he will never convince man if you talk to him about generations not yet born. man desires immortality. if you desire immortality, you would rather build a smokestack then stopped the environment from getting worse because you are not thinking about your great great great grandchildren. your thinking about you and your son. tavis: i take that. the problem is every politician always preaches about how this will impact our kids and our grandkids. we cannot pass this debt on to future generations. it works rhetorically but it did not worked. >> there are people in denial about climate change. tavis: what is paul ryan's future? was this not a win for him either way? >> he lost his state. he is dynamic. i do not think he is presidential timbre yet, he might throw himself in that race. if he is a tea party candidate, he might win the primaries but he is going to be around, he will be a force, he is likable, i think. i do not dismiss anything. the one thing i'v
politically than it was a year ago, four years ago. the environment will dictate a lot of how much latitude both sides have. first, the american people are fed up with congress and with politics. they want our leaders to bring some consensus to solving problems. also, because barack obama will not stand for reelection again, at least he says he won't, that takes the political tension out of this to some extent. there is always political tension. but that gives republicans more latitude to bringing accommodation to finding a solution. >> everyone is talking about finding a compromise. but let's face it, there are fewer liberal republicans, fewer democrats on capitol hill. fewer people like yourself who have worked on both sides. the politics is a point is that the moment. >> it is. and that is expected after a hard-fought, tough, bitter election, as much as any as i have seen. you'll have to let that drain out. but you do not need everybody to make a deal. you need 60 out of 100. and you need a majority in the house. you concentrate on the center- left, center-right group. everybody will hav
do well in a fiscal cliff environment. i'm not in these stocks just for the dividend. in a slow down, you want to own these drug stocks. i'm not worried about the competition. they all have lots of irons in the fire. ely lily always looks like it's breaking down. that's when you have to buy it. mid-40s, you really have to pull the trigger. please, don't panic. fiscal cliff is now top of the mine. we don't believe that people can rise above and, for broker, it's just too easy a call to say, hey, take some profits and move on. we'll be right back. >> announcer: coming up, new priorities. >> bring ourselves from foreign oil. we've got more work to do. >> announcer: america's energy debate isn't stopping post-election. it's just heating up. will the desire for independence push energy service stocks like clean harbors higher, or it could crack down on fracking extinguish their flame? cramer finds out when he talks to the c.e.o. next. and, later, the election correction? the market obliterated anything romney today. cramer is rummaging through the romney rubble to find you diamonds in the
, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on t
to accept cultural diversity, and all the religious practices that that kind of environment will propagate. >> and let me jump in there to try to- to put it in the framework of the class. that is the difficulty. that is the difficulty, because we have, you know, from an ethical point of view, where we're moved towards an understanding that is inclusive- we're being asked to treat other human beings in a way that is not so self-centered. but both of you, actually, i think are saying very similar things, which is there seems to be a problem in that inherent selfishness finds its way into any culture in any religion. what you're saying, susanna, really strikes me with the law profession, is that if you're- and we're back to the experiential dimension- if you conceive of yourself as the spoke in the wheel, you're the hub, the world revolves around you and everybody else is going to ultimately be after you, then it's very difficult to not take the newspapers, to not want to find a way to get ahead, to jump ahead. but you know, that's the way it is in society. warren, go ahead; you've had your h
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
choose to participate, and this came up with the department of environment. i was wondering if the department of real estate is thinking in the future, if there are other ways that we can borrow money for these tenant improvements at a lower interest rate. >> well, that's a very good question, and it's timely. because we are seeing this more and more frequently. and the reason we're seeing it more frequently is that the market is changing and there is less of an allowance provided by landlord than there was when the market was softer. so as this market continues to heat up there is less advantage to a tenant. and because of that, then we have to amortize our improvement costs. the challenge we have is each one of these individual deals is have fairly small so we're not talking about a large sum of money which we would normally think of in terms of a certificate of participation, or other fiscal mechanism we might have to borrow funds at very competitive rates. so we're in a market just like any other tenant is in the market. and what landlords will charge is in this 8% range
that produce the evidence-based are done in a sort of a cocoon environment that doesn't mirror, and then the research findings are reported in scientific studies that nobody reads or very few people read: a) because people don't have the time, b) because we almost purposely use language that nobody understands. so, unfortunately, i think these are key limitations to the real translation of research to practice in the field, and not just in behavioral health. dr. peterson, is that true for prevention as well? yes, i would say it is true for prevention as well. there are people who work in real-world settings who are interested in helping prevent problems from occurring-in this case, substance abuse or mental health issues-and they have a lot of constraints on their time. they have a lot of constraints on other resources-could be money, could be technology. and, in terms of bringing research to practice, things that are done in a laboratory or academic setting, if you will, sometimes are not readily translatable into real-world settings with those constraints happening and with a
concern for the social welfare and environment with growth. political analysts say incorporating it into the party's plat tomorrow will put hu on par with previous leaders. we'll continue to update you on that as the details come in. >>> in other news, opposition troops in the syria are setting their sights on key targets in the capital damascus. rebels say they fired mortars at president bashar al assad's palace. state-run media contradicted the rebels' account. it said opposition troops fired on residential areas in what it calls a terrorist attack. it said at least three people were killed. a day earlier, rebels set off a car bomb near the presidential palace. at least 11 people, including pro-government militiamen, died. opposition forces are reportedly bringing in fighters from other parts of syria to focus on damascus. human rights active uses say fighting around the country killed more than 200 people on tuesday alone. >>> an earthquake has struck the central american country of guatemala. at least 30 people are reported to have died. analysts with the u.s. geological surv
that switch backs are valid and necessary given the operating environment. they have worked on reducing the switchbacks and keeping the public informed and would further denigate service and safety. the jury answers, "that's what we're getting at that muni think it is switch backs are a normal way of business". other transportation systems were aghast, appalled that a transit system could inconvenience their customers so cavalierly and we wanthe
and how you respect your neighbors and the environment and distance between buildings and in addition to revoking that letter we're saying put conditions on that strip of land so whoever owns it, it is maintained as open space because currently with the variance and the september letter it's possible for the owner of lot 38 to build on that land and i have pictures of the light through windows on that property line and it's helpful to understand that as well. i hope that helps. >> okay. please proceed with your rebuttal. i address addressing the questions. >> thank you and just because the permits are issued and it's not a legal lot and it was written in numerous letters in the past. we did inform the zoning administrator when we requested the letter confirming what's happened in the past and the subdivision of the lots in 1954 and 55. we did inform the zoning administrator we would be applying for condoization. we would be going through that process and that we wanted to use this process of getting the planning department to weigh in on the historical subdivision to better und
but it has bigger effects because it's going to reduce the overall load of pesticides in our environment that workers and farmers are exposed to and make our way into our air and water so those are important reductions that go beyond our own home and can affect everybody's health. some tips there are to choose hormone-free meats and milks in particular, to go with organic dried beans or organic frozen fruits or vegetables, some of our colleagues have the dirty dozen of foods to almost always buy organic and the clean 15, which are foods that you can kind of skip the organic because they have a stronger protective, like a ban ban na which has such a big peel, keeps those pesticides out, so if you're working on an economy of scale, you know, go with organic with the ones that have the highest levels of pesticides. our website has a link to those tips so i can show you where that would be. and now we're going to pop into the living room and talk about flame retardants which are an important issue for any firefighters who are working in the field because it's those burns that are going to cr
and education about our waterfront, about the environment, about the balance of nature, and in the urban setting and of course it not have happened on the theme i will talk about the rest of my administration which is the team work that has to happen. we have rec and part that administers the bond. we have the port with its staff and byron and susan reynolds and working with public works to open up this area with the private sector whether it's ledge or the park advocates or the green space or the blue green advocates and this is all connected when i was taught during my dpb days and we had people walk along the water way and experience the wonderful, wonderful initial resources that we had, so all of these investments. >> >> will bring a lot of great use of open space to this area and not to forget we have a little off lease dog run that is also added
sustainable development, which takes into account social welfare and the environment, making this concept a guiding principle would be part of hu's legacy. it would give him the same status as leaders past including dung zhao ming and deng xiaoping. and it will help him maintain influence within the party after he steps down. hu also advocates during his speech that china's wealth gap is wide and widening, and he said that the communist party would continue its effort o fight corruption. >> translator: all those who violate party discipline and state laws, whoever they are, and whatever power or official positions they have, must be brought to justice without mercy. >> in some ways, president hu spoke directly to citizens who are fed up with corruption. the party is trying to keep a lead on anti-government movements by addressing public frustration. >> reporter: mitchitaka, what kind of changes are we going to see with the communist party's political bureau and the standing of the community? >> after the congress closes next wednesday, president hu would hand over the post of general secr
the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary.
in this environment and continue to proceed and be successful. i mean it when we say -- what we end up doing is so different. we work to scale every day. we invite the people that we serve every day. thank you to the nominees. to our leadership, thank you. thank you to all the winners and to all the people we get to work with and serve. thanks. [applause] >> let's hear it for the tax team. [applause] >> parking is a universal quality of life issue. it touches on so many different parts of the transportation system. we were looking for ways to make parking easier and more convenient. >> in the beginning, we looked at parking throw san francisco, and her desire to price parking based on demand is how it started. >> for 70 years, we've used flat meter rates and short time limits. that did not always work so well. it did not make it easier to find a parking space. sf park has two main components. the whole point is to get them off the road quickly. and to create more of an spaces. we're doing the man-responsive pricing. we're obligated to find the lowest rate possible. generally, most of the time, the
ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with . >> if our comments and whatever wrk we need to do, we could be as efficient as possible it would be greatly appreciated by everybody. just a few announcements. we got a thank you letter to the dbi staff, del rosaro from the permit department gtd a thank you letter. dbi staff were very helpful to mr. chin's reopening of his new business, ming khee restaurant, a good example of the staff doing their thing it make sure that smaller business got reopened again. i know the mayor's office was very happy about that. the small business when they are in this type of trouble it's great that we can help out. another 4-alarm fire unfortunately took place. as a consequence of that severe damage occurred, the director issued two emergency orders for the demolition of both, one west portal and one at (inaudible) west portal. the orders had 15 days to file for a required demolition permit and take other specified steps to comply with that order. as of today, one west portal is underway and we're expecti
in as regional environment but also globally. china needs stability in order to promote economic policies. >> thank you very much for coming in to talk with us. >> you are welcome. >> we will also have a look at the politically sensitive topic of rich and poor in china, a gap that has widened over the past 10 years, coming a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "i am not a puppet, and i will live and die in syria," defiant words from syria's president. >> in an interview with the satellite broadcaster of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have a domino impact around the world. we begin with the latest. >> here is where the first protests of assad took place. this video claims to show the result of a government air strike on the city's great mosque. meanwhile, rebels say they have taken one of the two remaining government-controlled posts along the turkish border. in a rare interview, bashar al- assad was defiant. speaking to russian television, he ruled o
welfare and environment, making this concept a guiding principle would be part of hu's legacy. it would give him the same status as leaders past, inclu including dan xioping, and it would help him maintain influence within the party after he steps down. he also admitted during his speech china's gap is wide and widening, and he said the communist party would continue its effort to fight corruption. >> translator: all those who violate party discipline and state laws, whoever they are and whatever power or official positions they have must brought to justice without mercy. >> reporter: in some ways, president hu spoke directly to citizens who are fed up with corruption. the party is trying to keep a lead of government movements by addressing public frustration. >> michitaka, what kind of changes are we going to see with the community party's political bureau and its inner leadership, the politburo's standing committee? >> reporter: right. after the congress closes next wednesday, president hu would hand over the post of general secretary to vice president xi jinping, for a younger genera
, they are going to blend into the environment it's in right now? >> exactly. >> it's going to blend into the restaurant? no way. >> so their ford fusion stands out, as they say it already does, the other competitor cars in the background are painted to blend right in. it's amazing how well it happens. >>> that's going to do it for us here at rtm. thanks for joining us. we'll see you tomorrow, everybody.
a particular worldview and a set of assumptions and values that increasingly in a polarized environment makes it difficult for them to vote for scott brown and linda lingle and heather wilson. the problems with republicans is that they're based -- that's a very ideologically driven voters, tea party folks, but part of the republican base is more open, friendly, to voting for democrats than the democratic base is for voting for republicans, i believe. i'm sure we could chew this over. let me give you an example. but me give you an example. heidi is a terrific candidate in north olympic terrific candidate and north dakota. mitt romney won north dakota by 20, 21 points. and heidi was able to overcome that. it's true that she won them as the president one north dakota, slightly less than president, that mr. romney one north dakota slightly less than the president one massachusetts. but i think the republican coalition includes kind of a soft swing voter that is inclined to vote republican, but is more willing to vote for democrats. and, jim matheson surviving utah is amazing. amazing. john barrow
to conserve their environment, this sa lost world. i see this as kind of an advertisement for trying to preserve those kinds of environments, so we can all live together somehow on the planet. >>> right now, at 6:00, the northeast part of the country has survived back-to-back storms, and now another change is coming. >>> the man who tried to assassinate a member of congress is sentenced to live in prison. >>> part of the city skyline might be about to change. good evening, i'm jim vance. >> and i'm doreen gentzler. first, the so-called fiscal cliff. priority number one, for congress and president obama, making a deal that avoids financial disaster. steve handelsman is on capitol hill with more on this. >> reporter: thanks, doreen. this fight is still all about taxes. here on capitol hill there are
or anything but we all know him and he was worried about the regulatory environment that we're going to see in the future, and his thought was that with the people that would be put in place, like-minded people put in place over the next four years it will take 25 before it's gone. i go well we'll both be dead by then. i hope not, but in all likelihood before this reverses, then i went to the liquor cabinet again, and anyway. could it be 25 years before we reverse some of the regulatory? >> i haven't thought out that far but -- >> you're still young. you might be alive. >> perhaps. >> dodd-frank only a third of the rules for dodd-frank have been implemented. >> talk about which ones are coming back. >> we've only just begun. >> which is why the financials sold off yesterday. >>> if you have comments, questions, anything you see on squawk, shoot us an e-mail squawk@cnbc.com, and follow us on twitter. >>> power in the nation, which companies are best equipped to keep your lights on? >>> later, athenahealth jonathan bush, the younger cousin -- anyway, we'll talk about the election results and
is that on your priority list? >> for me having been the chairman of the environment committee twice, i have spent my -- a lot of my career greeting voters in nevada and doing things that i think are environmentally important. climate change is an extremely important issue for me and i hope we can address it reasonably as we have seen with the storms that are overwhelming our country in the world. we need to do something about it. thank you. >> good afternoon. let me start by offering my congratulations to president obama and the first lady and the vice-president. like many americans i was hoping that this election would turn out differently. there rummy and paul ryan are good man and the leaders. i want to wish them and their families well. the american people have spoken. they have reelected president obama and they have reelected the putt -- a republican majority. there is a mandate in yesterday's results and a mandate to find a way to work together on the solutions to the challenges will face as a nation. a message today is not one of confrontation but one of conviction. in the weeks and month
the city, san francisco has created an environment that embraces and celebrates innovation. innovation is not a significant driver of economic growth, but it enables us to tackle some of the most long-standing problems and historic challenges that we face. that's why i continue to support and promote innovation in both the civic and private sectors to create a better san francisco. and with all of these technology companies that are moving into the city, we need to make sure that our work force is trained and ready to fill these positions. to do this we have launched tech sf with an $8 million dollar grant from the department of labor that will provided case, training and job placement assistance in the tech sector. whether it's for young people coming out of high school or college or people retooling in the middle of their careers or are returning our veterans who want a chance to work in our technology industry, we're working hard to ensure san francisco residents have the skills, the training and the opportunities to work in these jobs. this is a critical step to making sure tha
the department of the environment to accept and expend a grant in the amount of 2.977 million to continue energy use and demand reduction through energy efficiency program in the city for the period of october 15, 2012 through december 31, 2012. >> president chiu: this resolution is adopted. next item. >> clerk calvillo: mr. president, next item is roll call for introductions. >> president chiu: let's go to roll call. >> clerk calvillo: supervisor ferrell. supervisor carmen chu. i wanted to adjourn in the memory of -- she died yesterday at age 87, spent world war ii and was imprisoned in the prison camp. she moved to the u.s. and then san francisco in 1952. her husband and she opened emerald cleaners. she will be missed by her daughters, and her many, many grandchildren and great grandchildren. thank you. >> clerk calvillo: thank you. supervisor wiener. >> supervisor wiener: today i'm introducing three companion pieces of legislation, culminating from about a year's worth of work, to modernize how san francisco regulates the food truck industry in our city. this legislation is aimed at striking
as well as the department of the environment about possible ways that we can better reach out about the program. and that's it, thank you. >> thank you very much. any questions from members of the commission? thank you. mr. dick allen. >> i'm sorry, i actually do have a comment on that. i believe we are in receipt of one of the cca stakeholders who was interested in participating and felt there wasn't adequate notice that was going to be agendized on your agenda. so i would encourage you to make sure especially all of those gripes that worked on cca, when you do talk about that issue, that you make effort to invite them so that they can hear about what you come up with at your committee. >>> absolutely, absolutely. >> thank you. >>> i think we got the letter as we were setting the agenda. but since we now have plenty of time frame, we should be able to invite anyone and everyone who might want to come. >> that sounds good, thank you. >>> thanks. >> thank you, mr. jones. mr. allen. >>> my name is dick allen. i've been a roller at lake merced for the past 20 years and i was co-chair o
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
the rubric that the water environment foundation and also the american water works association says are the 10 attributes for an effective utility management function. and a number of these attributes you'll see look very familiar to what you have as strategic sustainability goals as well as your items to the bottom line policies and other. so, what could be the possibility in next step is to perfect this report card style. and you see a column for each one and whether we have a path that needs improvement, that would be a one-page summary of how we're doing. so, that's a great deal -- i talked quite a long time, and, so, if there are any questions, i'd be happy to try to help. >> i think it would be very helpful having once represented a district that was very low-income in los angeles as to where these parks are that are still left outstanding, the 14 you mentioned. are they in neighborhoods we should be concerned about or are they all over the city? >> so, what is really nice about what the city services auditor has done, the report card they do for parks and streets extends to o
to and from their place of employment and not to mention the effects on the environment, but just the cost factors. but i think you can use a report like this to be a fool and help us to make our decisions, but also formulate city policy to address some of the shortcomings. * a tool >> absolutely. >> sugaya. >> yes. is there any correlation between what we're calling p-d-r on page 16 and manufacturing which is back on page 40? >> good question. >> because it seems like -- i have to just finish my observation. >> sure. >> because on p-d-r we're down over the 2002-11 years by 26%. it went up slightly in the middle years there, in 2006 and '07. if you go back to page 40 and look at the manufacturing totals, it's pretty surprising that in 2011 we have more information jobs than we did back in 2002. so, you don't have to answer that question now. but if, you know, i don't know if p-d-rs totally -- if manufacturing is a broader category or if it encompasses p-d-r or what the -- >> well, what might be useful now, i look at that number and see if it's a mistake or not because that does look a lit
environment makes it difficult for them to vote for scott brown and heather wilson. the problems -- the problem with the republicans -- they have some very ideologically driven voters, but part of the republican base is more open to voting for democrats than the democratic base is to vote for republicans, i believe. that even example. heidi is a terrific candidate in north dakota. mitt romney one north dakota by 21. and i was able to overcome that. it is true that she -- that the president one north dakota slightly less than -- at mitt romney 1 north dakota at slightly less than the president's won massachusetts. but the republican coalition includes kind of a soft swing voter that is inclined to vote republican, but as more willing to vote for democrats. john barrow in georgia, the republican candidate was horrendous. a challenger refused to debate the incumbent. [laughter] i didn't say it was a bad decision, i just said it says something about the challenger. i think this is an additional problem. it is easier for moderate, centrist democrats to feel the republican voters than
the in and out food oriented environment. and usually you'll find people enjoying a glass of beer or wine with their meal and having conversation with reasonable level of sound. the restaurant provides a significant number of jobs to the area employing 16 employees both come from within the immediate neighborhood and other san francisco neighborhoods. basically, the 300 foot radius use map -- and i apologize it's quite a bit lighter than on my slide, but i think you have that in your information packet. you can see that within the 300-foot radius there is quite a mixture of residential, commercial, especially along the north south access, fillmore street, and then going east -- going sutter street, the boxes that are in dark blue indicate other eating and dining establishments within the 300-foot radius. and so, there's quite a precedent in the neighborhood for eating and dining establishments as well as their little starred areas within the radius one, two, three, four different eating and dining establishments that do allow outdoor dining. so, o there is a precedent for that as well. th
in this environment? >> really large banks. because with all the costs of kline's, you have to get to a certain economy of scale. we have 7,000 banks, many of these banks would not be around in two or three years. >> tom: because of failure or because they will be bought out? >> well, because of not being able to have the economies of scale to manage these compliance cost. you just have to have too many people. and only a bank of a certain size, shape, 500 million, at least a billion dollars. and so many of our banks are under that size, economies of scale. >> tom: that say big sized bank there we've got with independent bank list tonight, kenneth thomas. >> tom: republicans are still reeling from tuesday's loss in the presidential election. it was the fifth out the past six presidential elections where the republican party has lost the popular vote. republicans may have kept control of the house this time around, but they lost seats in the senate. many strategists say the results suggest it's time for the party to rethink how it sells its economic message. sylvia hall reports. >> reporter: tue
are in this country today. what's the environment. economically we are extraordinarily troubled times. we have a president that cannot balance the budget, doesn't send a budget that gets any votes up to the hill. so that's what i would say that women who are undecided need to look at, how do we turn that around? the answer is to those concerns is to take a look at what mitt romney promises to do. >> why did the gender gap finally re-emerge in the president's favor so definitively in the last few days of campaigning. >> candidly, bonnie, i think it, quote, disappeared. because the president failed to mention women in that first debate. he has since made up for that and it shows in the gender gap. >> bonnie, look, fewer women have jobs today than they did under barack obama. more woman are in poverty, on food stamps, more children face larger debt than ever faced in the history of this country. real gap what president obama has promised women in what he's actually delivered and i don't think just because "new york times" says there's a new gap that there is necessarily a new gender gap. >> the g
original building and parents are concerned. >> it is not a comfortable environment for them. it should be a place where they can interact with other students. >> it seems like they were -- they are segregated. >> you have seen them, over the summer they added two more trailers. you can imagine where that is going to go. >> the future may not be much brighter. the school population over five years is going to grow by more than 2500 students. over the next 10 years, it expects a 6.8% increase. the numbers will rise even more for elementary schools. officials said they have a good idea of what is driving the numbers. >> there was a trend around 2002, there was an increase in birth rates in baltimore county. they came to us as kindergarten students. our classes have been large. >> overcrowded schools are making room by adding extra space, even if it means relocating. for long-term relief, the district is looking for space to build. but will it come soon enough? >> i have gone to the meetings and they are addressing that. they are taking it step by step. >> parents can only hope more relief
of the regulatory environment possibly telecom because of dividends. so i think there needs to be some adjustment. i don't think this is necessarily the breakdown that causes, you know, a bear market or anything like that. ashley: you say that the tech sector is the best one to positioned the best if you like under the obama administration. what is your reasoning on that? >> sure, if you look at the 10 economic sector groups, technology is probably best positioned under this new environment because, technology shares, technology companies, typically aren't very heavily regulated. so we don't expect any new increased regulation on tech shares. and among the 10 economic sector groups, technology companies have the lowest dividend yields. so that any increase in the dividend tax will impair them less than their couper parts. i think the only area where we could see tech companies stung would be if president obama's plan to tax foreign profits comes back to haunt the group because keep in mind, companies like microsoft and apple pay on average six or 7% in taxes. not 35 that the corporate tax rate is, l
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